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Agricultural Commodity Markets, Pricing, and Supply Chain Risk Management 5 day course. Melbourne. 2-6th February 2015

Objectives of the course - On completion of the course, participants will be able to:
* Understand commodity market mechanisms and basis for price discovery
* Identify forward market characteristics and their significance
* Improve your risk decision making in your business and supply chain operations
* Recognize trade-offs in risk: return decision making under uncertainty
* Design and implement flexible strategies in decision making
* Hedge commodities and manage currency and basis risk
* Compare and evaluate strategies including advanced strategies

 

Agricultural Commodity Markets, Pricing, and Supply Chain Risk Management 3 day course. Melbourne. 11-13th May 2015

 

Cotton Commodity Market and Supply Chain Risk Management course. Geelong. 25 - 26th September 2014

DO YOU UNDERSTAND HOW TO INTERPRET FORWARD MARKET SIGNALS FOR BUYING/SELLING AND PRICING?

This course conducted by Dr John Williams is designed as an two-day adjunct to the Field to Fabric course for producers, merchants, and end-users wanting to have a better understanding of commodity markets, forward markets, and market signals, and apply risk management strategies in buying/selling/pricing decision making. This is a basic course leading to strategy application when buying, selling, pricing, and hedging. The two-day course covers topics such as price charting and technical analyses, risk measurement, basis for pricing determination, integration with commercial trade markets, interpreting the different types of forward markets, risk transfer and trade-offs, problems with operations risk management, market positioning and off-setting mechanisms, issues with buying/selling, forward contracting, futures markets, hedging risks, incorporating flexibility into pricing strategies, reading an options market, options hedging, OTC pricing products, and developing techniques to evaluate market/price strategies and tactics.

Dr John Williams has extensive experience training Australian agricultural producers, merchants, and end-users for the past eighteen years, and has facilitated cotton risk management courses in all the major East Coast production regions. He has written a number of textbooks including the 1999 book Agricultural Price Risk Management: The Principles of Commodity Trading; the 2012 book Competition and Efficiency in International Food Supply Chains: Improving food security; and the 2013 book release Agricultural Supply Chains and the Challenge of Price Risk.

To register or for more details: Email comm.trade@bigpond.com   

Field to Fabric cotton course.  Geelong. 22 - 24th Sept 2014

Have you ever wondered whether agricultural practices, storage, ginning and handling of cotton have an impact upon the quality of the end product? Then the Field to Fabric training course is for you. The course, run by CSIRO’s Dr Rene van der Sluijs with funding from CRDC, looks at cotton quality and how it is managed at all stages of the cotton pipeline: from on-farm to the finished fibre product. The course is designed for all involved in cotton, from growers to technologists, and looks at how all segments of the industry operate and relate to each other. The course program covers global perspectives, variety selection, agronomy, fibre properties, harvesting, ginning, classing, marketing, yarn manufacture, fabric formation, dyeing, finishing and printing, and environmental issues. A course program and registration form is available from Dr van der Sluijs via email: rene.vandersluijs@csiro.au. Note, places are limited.

Dr John Williams. Executive Director with a doctorate in supply chain decision making, masters in agribusiness, degrees in economics and agricultural science, a diploma in technical analysis, and authored Competition and Efficiency in International Food Supply Chains: Improving Food Security (2012) and Agricultural Supply Chains and the Challenge of Price Risk (2013). John specializes in supply chain risk management, the development of forward markets, supply chain integration, improving competition, and increasing efficiency. He has worked on supply chain projects in China, Vietnam, and the Middle East.

Dr Lawrie Dooley. Director of Supply Chains, with postgraduate qualifications from the University of Melbourne, Monash University and the Australian National University, and with more than 30 years experience in food and agribusiness. He has taught Agribusiness at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level at Melbourne, Monash and La Trobe Universities and developed Masters degrees in Agribusiness and Food Business Management. He won the competitive bid under the Australian National Food Industry Strategy to develop the first national program in food business management. He has been awarded nationally competitive research grants, and recently completed research into leadership styles in agri-food supply chains.

Dr Alistair Watson. Doctorate in agricultural economics, with degrees in economics and agricultural science. Alistair specializes in agricultural commodity supply chain research both in Australia and China, particularly in grains and wool. He focuses on the links between domestic agricultural policy and agricultural trade in both developing and developed countries. In recent years, he has worked extensively on water policy issues in Australia, China and India.

Geoff Dunlop. Honours graduate in rural science, and specializes in irrigated crop production and cotton-grain farm management. He grows cotton at Carah (NSW) and owns a contract farming and picking business since 1987. He was the Cotton Industry Program Leader Moree TAFE (1991-2007), and developed the fully accredited Australian Cotton Ginning Training program Cert 2-4 in conjunction with the USDA and major ginning organisations.

Rene van der Sluijs. Masters degree in Textile Science as well as a Masters Degree in Business Administration, researcher, consultant, trainer, and author. He is a post-harvest textile technologist with project management experience in the spinning industry, and a certified quality, environmental and OHS systems auditor. He was awarded the 2008 Australian cotton researcher of the year award.

 

India to overtake China as top cotton producer

By Agrimoney.com - 02/05/2014

The International Cotton Advisory Council (ICAC) nudged higher its forecast for cotton prices next season, forecasting a deeper drop in Chinese output than many investors – enough to lose the country its place as the top producer. The revision came as the ICAC trimmed by 170,000 tonnes to 20.87m tonnes its forecast for world stocks at the close of 2014-15, if still enough to represent an all-time high by a margin. The downgrade reflected a weaker estimate for production, now seen falling 540,000 tonnes to 25.16m tonnes year on year. And that decline is down in the main to China, thanks to a shake-up of the government subsidy schemes which, in a pilot programme, is offering support only to growers in Xinjiang, the top growing province. "Most of the decline in world production will occur in China, where production is expected to decline by 10% from 6.7m tonnes in 2013-14 to 6m tonnes in 2014-15," the ICAC said. "As the Chinese government has restricted its support for cotton to just the Xinjiang region, area outside is expected to fall significantly."

At 6m tonnes, China would lose its rank as the world's top producing country, falling behind India, for which the ICAC forecast output coming in at 6.3m tonnes. That in itself is a 2% fall year on year, reflecting an expectation "that the monsoon weather will not be as favourable as in 2013-14". China has not produced less cotton than India since 1962, according to records from the US Department of Agriculture, which has itself pegged Chinese output this year at 30.5m bales (6.6m tonnes).

However, the ICAC forecast China retaining its place as the world's top consumer. Indeed, the subsidy reforms will put the brakes on a decline in China's cotton demand, expected to slow just 1% to 7.8m tonnes in 2014-15, after tumbling by 17% since the country in 2011 introduced the subsidy scheme now being phased out. This regime offered a guaranteed government price, far above the world market rate, encouraging farmers to sell to the state and raising the domestic cotton price to an extra that Chinese mills were rendered uncompetitive. "Although lower cotton prices are welcomed by the mills in China, a lot of damage has been done to the industry in the past few years by the Chinese government's cotton policy," the committee said.

The ICAC also estimated Chinese much-watched cotton imports - the world's biggest - at 2.2m tonnes in 2014-15 a drop of 30% year on and year, and 60% below the record two seasons ago. The USDA has forecast China's imports next season at 8.0m bales (1.7m tonnes). Chinese buyers have so far bought 102,500 bales of US cotton ahead for 2014-15, above the 80,600 bales purchased forward at this time a year ago.

Research objectives                                                                                                                               

To enhance the knowledge of how efficiency can be achieved in supply chains

To promote stronger commercial trade markets within fibre supply chains

To foster an awareness of the importance of forward markets

To encourage integrative operations within fibre supply chains

To increase competition and efficiency within supply chains

To improve profitability in fibre supply chains chains  

To manage price risk for cotton and wool                                                             

 

Research projects                                                                                                                            

  • Investigate improvements in wool selling methods
  • Methods to improve the adoption of risk management practices
  • Study the correlations and dependency of different fibre types
  • The development of an efficient wool forward market                                                 


                          

Agricultural Commodity Markets, Pricing, and Supply Chain Risk Management 5 day course. Melbourne. 2-6th February 2015

Objectives of the course - On completion of the course, participants will be able to:
* Understand commodity market mechanisms and basis for price discovery
* Identify forward market characteristics and their significance
* Improve your risk decision making in your business and supply chain operations
* Recognize trade-offs in risk: return decision making under uncertainty
* Design and implement flexible strategies in decision making
* Hedge commodities and manage currency and basis risk
* Compare and evaluate strategies including advanced strategies

 

Agricultural Commodity Markets, Pricing, and Supply Chain Risk Management 3 day course. Melbourne. 11-13th May 2015

 

Cotton Commodity Market and Supply Chain Risk Management course. Geelong. 28 - 29th August 2014.

Cotton Field to Fabric Training Course. Geelong. 25-27th August 2014

Cotton Field to Fabric Training Course. Geelong. 21-23rd September 2014

 

Cotton Commodity Market and Supply Chain Risk Management course. Geelong. 28 - 29th August 2014

DO YOU UNDERSTAND HOW TO INTERPRET FORWARD MARKET SIGNALS FOR BUYING/SELLING AND PRICING?

This course conducted by Dr John Williams is designed as an two-day adjunct to the Field to Fabric course for producers, merchants, and end-users wanting to have a better understanding of commodity markets, forward markets, and market signals, and apply risk management strategies in buying/selling/pricing decision making. This is a basic course leading to strategy application when buying, selling, pricing, and hedging. The two-day course covers topics such as price charting and technical analyses, risk measurement, basis for pricing determination, integration with commercial trade markets, interpreting the different types of forward markets, risk transfer and trade-offs, problems with operations risk management, market positioning and off-setting mechanisms, issues with buying/selling, forward contracting, futures markets, hedging risks, incorporating flexibility into pricing strategies, reading an options market, options hedging, OTC pricing products, and developing techniques to evaluate market/price strategies and tactics.

Dr John Williams has extensive experience training Australian agricultural producers, merchants, and end-users for the past eighteen years, and has facilitated cotton risk management courses in all the major East Coast production regions. He has written a number of textbooks including the 1999 book Agricultural Price Risk Management: The Principles of Commodity Trading; the 2012 book Competition and Efficiency in International Food Supply Chains: Improving food security; and the 2013 book release Agricultural Supply Chains and the Challenge of Price Risk.

To register or for more details: Email comm.trade@bigpond.com

     

Field to Fabric cotton course.  Geelong. 25 - 27th August 2014

Have you ever wondered whether agricultural practices, storage, ginning and handling of cotton have an impact upon the quality of the end product? Then the Field to Fabric training course is for you. The course, run by CSIRO’s Dr Rene van der Sluijs with funding from CRDC, looks at cotton quality and how it is managed at all stages of the cotton pipeline: from on-farm to the finished fibre product. The course is designed for all involved in cotton, from growers to technologists, and looks at how all segments of the industry operate and relate to each other. The course program covers global perspectives, variety selection, agronomy, fibre properties, harvesting, ginning, classing, marketing, yarn manufacture, fabric formation, dyeing, finishing and printing, and environmental issues.The 2014 Field to Fabric training course will be held at CSIRO’s Textile and Fibre Technology facility in Geelong VIC on 25-27 August 2014. A course program and registration form is available from Dr van der Sluijs via email: rene.vandersluijs@csiro.au. Note, places are limited.

 

Dooley, L. and E. Luca. 2010. New and effective leadership in agribusiness value chains. RIRDC, 10-099, 1-96, Canberra.

Williams, J. 2014. Wool Selling Methods. Australian Commodity Research Institute, Melbourne.

Ada, T., Malcolm, B. and Williams, J. 2006. A survey of price risk management in the Australian cotton industry. Australasian Agribusiness Review 14(4): 1-25.

Williams, J, 2015. Wool Selling Sytems Review. Submission to the Australian Wool Innovation 2015 Wool Selling Systems Review, Food and Fibre Supply Chain Institute, Melbourne.

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